2008 Blog Archive

Wilbanks on the Control Fallacy: How Radical Sharing out-competes

Closing the first day of the International Digital Curation Conference, and as a prelude to a substantial audience discussion, John Wilbanks from Science Commons outlined his vision and his group’s plans and achievements. His slides are available on Slideshare and from the IDCC web site.

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Bryan Lawrence on metadata as limit on sustainability

Opening the Sustainability session at the Digital Curation Conference, Bryan Lawrence of the Centre for Environmental Data Archival and the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), spoke trenchantly (as always) on sustainability with specific reference to the metadata needed for preservation and curation, and for facilitation for now and the future. Preservation is not enough; active curation is needed.

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International Digital Curation Conference Keynote

I'm not sure how much I should be blogging about this conference, given that the DCC ran it, and I chaired quite a few sessions etc. But since I've got the scrappy notes, I may try to turn some of them into blog posts. I've spotted blog postings from Kevin Ashley on da blog, and Cameron Neylon on Science in the Open, so far.

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Edinburgh IT futures workshop

I spent Friday morning at a workshop entitled “Research, wRiting and Reputation” at Edinburgh University. Pleasingly, data form quite a large part of the programme (although I’ll miss the afternoon talks, including Simon Coles from Southampton). First speaker is Prof Simon Tett of Geosciences talking about data curation and climate change. Problem is that climate change is slow, relative to changes in the observation systems, not to mention changes in computation and data storage.

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Curation services based on the DCC Curation Lifecycle Model

I’ve had a go at exploring some curation services that might be appropriate at different stages of a research project. I thought it might also be worth trying to explore curation services suggested by the DCC Curation Lifecycle Model, which I also mentioned in a blog post a few weeks ago.

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Comments on an obsolescence scale, please

Many people in this business know the famous Jeff Rothenberg quote: “It is only slightly facetious to say that digital information lasts forever--or five years, whichever comes first” (Rothenberg, 1995). Having just re-read the article, it’s clear that at that point he was particularly concerned about the fragility of storage media, something that doesn’t concern me for this post. What does concern me is the subject of much of the rest of his article: obsolescence of the data.

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Research Data Management email list created

At JISC's request, we have created a new list to support discussion amongst those interested in management of research data. The list is Research-Dataman@jiscmail.ac.uk, and can be joined at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/RESEARCH-DATAMAN.html. The list description is:"List to discuss the data management issues arising in and from research projects in UK Higher Education and its partners in the UK research community and internationally, established by the Digital Curation Centre on behalf of the JISC."

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Keeping the records of science accessible: can we afford it?

There's an excellent summary available of the 2008 conference of the Alliance for Permanent Access to the Records of Science Conference, with the above title. It was in Budapest on 4 November, 2008. I wasn't able to go, unfortunately, but it looks like it might have been pretty interesting.

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Just sharing

Like several others in the blogosphere, I really enjoyed Scott Leslie’s post on EdTechBlog: Planning to Share versus Just Sharing. It is in the learning domain but I was glad that Andy Powell picked up its relevance to repositories in his follow-up on eFoundations.Perhaps the key points that Andy picks up are

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Project data life course

This blog post is an attempt to explore the “life course” of an arbitrary small to medium research project with respect to data resources involved in the project. (I want to avoid the term life cycle, since we use this in relation to the actual data.)

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