2008 Blog Archive

iPres 2008 Building Trust

Tyler Walters of GIT comparing trust in the banking system with trust in repositories. The upheavals in banking currently show how easily trust can be upset, and how hard it is to regain once lost. Further desk study on trust; 3 major sources (see paper for references). Useful idea of trust antecedents: what comes before an event that helps you trust, subjectively. Trust that endures is more likely to continue if there’s a breach of trust. Trust is a relationship between people, more than institutions. Trust development: engage, listen, frame issues, envision options, commit.

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iPres 2008 National approaches

A bit late this morning (ahem!), so I missed some of the start of this. A very interesting and thoughtful exposition from Steve Knight of NZNL. They have a recently revised act, and have really taken digital preservation to heart: quote from their CEO “no job un-changed”! It’s not the platform or software, it’s the business approach, and management of provenance. They gave up on ”pointless” discussions on build vs buy, commercial vs open source: what counts is the requirements.

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iPres 2008- past, present and future

Heike Neuroth talking about the start of iPres, conceived at IFLA in 2003. Starting in Beijing, then Germany, next the US at Cornell, then back to Beijing, before coming to the UK this year. She thinks this child is growing up unstoppably now. Adam Farquhar commenting on the increasingly practical nature of reports: “doing it”.

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iPres 2008: Risks and Costs

Paul Wheatley of the BL talking about LIFE2, a refinement of the earlier LIFE project. The LIFE model is a map of the digital life cycle from the point of view of the preserving organisation. The LIFE V2.0 model is slightly reorganised and refined, for example including sub-elements. It also has a methodology for application. In addition, there is the beginning of a Generic Preservation Model (GPM), derived from some desk study.

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iPres 2008 Preservation planning session

Starting with Dirk von Suchodoletz from Freiburg, talking about emulation. I’ve always had a problem with emulation; perhaps I’ve too long a memory of those early days of MS-DOS, when emulators were quite good at running well-behaved programs, but were rubbish at many common programs, which broke the rule-book and went straight into the interrupt vectors to get performance. OK, if you’re not that old, maybe emulation does work better these days, and is even getting trendy under the new name of virtualisation.

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iPres 2008 session 2

Oya Rieger has been speaking about their large scale book digitisation processes. They first entered an agreement with Microsoft, and later with Google; they were naturally very disappointed when Microsoft pulled out, although this did give them unrestricted access to the books digitised under that programme. On the down-side, they suddenly found they need 40 TB of storage to manage these resources, and it took a year or so before they could achieve this.

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iPres 2008, session 1

Here are a few notes that I took during the initial iPres 08 session at the British Library this week. The opening keynote was from Dame Lynne Brindley of the BL, describing some of her institutions approaches and projects. She also noted the increase in public awareness of the need for preservation, including the wide coverage of a project with a name like Email Month (although I don't seem able to find this!).

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Data as major component of national research collaboration

This is perhaps the last of my posts resulting from conversations and presentations at the UK e-Science All Hands meeting in Edinburgh. This one relates to Andrew Treloar’s presentation on the Australian National Data Service (ANDS), and its over-arching programme, Platforms for Collaboration, part of the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy.

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ARCHER: a component of Australian e-Research infrastructure?

At the e-Science All Hands meeting, David Groenewegen from Monash spoke (PPT, also from Nick Nicholas and Anthony Beitz) about the outputs of the ARCHER project, almost finished, intended to provide tools for e-Research infrastructure. They see these e-Research challenges:

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A national data mandate? Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

Andrew Treloar pointed to this Code in a presentation at the e-Science All Hands meeting. All Australian Universities have signed up to the Code, which turns out to have a whole chapter on the management of research data and primary materials. It deals with the responsibilities of both institutions and researchers.

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