2010 Blog Archive

NSF to Ask Every Grant Applicant for Data Management Plan

US funding body the National Science Foundation (NSF) intends to require a 2-page Data Management Plan with all funding applications, according to a news article on Science Insider. The article quotes NSF's Edward Seidel  describing the plans, which will be subject to 'merit review', as phase one of "a broader effort to address the growing interest from U.S. policymakers in making sure that any data obtained with federal funds be accessible to the general public". Any influence on UK funding body polices remains to be seen.

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MyTARDIS/TARDIS helps secure data

Monash researchers have developed a revolutionary online data management program that is being used by scientists at the Australian Synchrotron and exported to institutions around the world.The project has been developed with the support of the Monash eResearch Centre (MeRC), the Victorian e-Research Strategic Initiative (VeRSI), the Australian Synchrotron and the Australian National Data Service (ANDS).

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Wall Street Journal signals advance in data sharing at Sage Commons Congress

The online version of the Wall Street Journal has recently published an article by Amy Dockser Marcus which highlights the weaknesses in the current approach to scientific data sharing and their effect upon the efficacy of even a highly expensive project such as the development of a new drug.

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Liz Lyon Interviewed for ABC Science Online

During her visit to Australia in November 2009, Liz Lyon was interviewed for her thoughts towards the article Putting the citizen into science by Suzannah Lyons which has recently been published by ABC Science Online. Asked about the increased involvement of ordinary people in scientific projects, Liz remarked:

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Digimap is 10

I had a very enjoyable day yesterday helping EDINA celebrate 10 years of the Digimap service. What began as an eLib project and experiment with 6 Universities in 1996 has grown to a mature service with over 100,000 users, 45,000 of them active, in pretty much every UK University, and soon in UK schools as well.

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Linked data and staff contact pages

You may remember that I am interested in the extent to which we should use Semantic Web (or Linked Data) on the DCC web site.

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Scholarly HTML would be nice, but...

I'm quite interested in the idea of Scholarly HTML, as espoused in Pete Sefton's blog, and I've commented on some of Peter Murray Rust's hamburger PDF comments previously (although I do think a lot of people confuse wild PDF with well-made, should one say Scholarly PDF). I've always been slightly worried by one thing though.

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Persistence of domain names

I had a chat before Christmas with Henry Thompson, who works both in Edinburgh Informatics and also on the W3C TAG. Insofar as the Internet is important in sustaining long term access to information in digital form, there is a sustainability problem that we rather seem to have ignored. Everything on the Internet (literally) depends on domain names, and these are only ever rented. There is no mechanism for permanently reserving a domain name.

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Digital Curation Centre User Survey 2009: Highlights

My colleague Angus Whyte has provided the following brief summary of two surveys carried out in Phases 1 and 2 of the Digital Curation Centre, in 2006 and 2009 respectively, as part of our evaluations. In retrospect, we might have done better revising the questions for the second survey rather more than we did; nevertheless I thought it worth while sharing this with you.

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