An Introduction to Open Science

27 October 2016
Park Inn by Radisson York City Centre, York

Overview

Open Science is the practice of science in such a way that others can collaborate and contribute, where research data, lab notes and other research processes are freely available, under terms that enable reuse, redistribution and reproduction of the research and its underlying data and methods.

This half-day training course:

  • Explains the drivers behind Open Science;
  • Provides opportunities to discuss the arguments around Openness with colleagues from a range of backgrounds;
  • Introduces useful resources to help you apply Open Science concepts in your own practice. 

The agenda comprises a mixture of presentations and interactive exercises.

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Open Research applies similar practices to the social sciences and humanities, combining elements such as Open Access to publications, open data, Open Source code and open methodologies in order ‘to make clear accounts of the methodology freely available via the internet, along with any data or results extracted or derived from them’.

Open Science and Open Research exist within a policy context of ever-greater transparency, accessibility and accountability, wherein stakeholders in the research process – from fellow researchers, funders, and interested members of the general public – increasingly expect to be able to access and reuse the outputs of taxpayer funded research with as few barriers (in terms of time and cost of gaining access) in their way.

The impetus for openness in research comes from an interplay of research policy pressures and grassroots effort in research communities, such as astronomy, bioscience, and physics. For example the High Energy Physics community was an early champion of Open Access publication, seeing benefit in sharing research freely ahead of its formal publication via traditional outlets. A variety of other domains have found benefits in freely sharing results, and the underlying data, processes or code. Governments and other funders also see openness as a catalyst for increasing public and commercial engagement with research, bringing about both societal and commercial benefit. The main goals of these developments are to lower barriers to accessing the outputs of publicly funded research, to speed up the research process, and to strengthen the quality, integrity, impact and longevity of the scholarly record, as well as providing better returns on investment.

This half-day training course:

  • Explains the drivers behind Open Science;
  • Provides opportunities to discuss the arguments around Openness with colleagues from a range of backgrounds;
  • Introduces useful resources to help you apply Open Science concepts in your own practice. 

The agenda comprises a mixture of presentations and interactive exercises.

 
Audience

This is a general introductory session, which will be of interest to researchers, research students and research support professionals such as librarians and administrators.

Outcomes

Upon completion of the training, attendees will:

  • Understand what ‘Open Science’ and ‘Open Research’ entail;
  • Understand and be able to articulate the benefits and challenges of Open Access and data sharing for twenty-first century research;
  • Understand the purpose and expectations of research funders’ mandates, including Horizon 2020;
  • Be aware of useful tools and resources to help meet these expectations.

Agenda

Time

Session / Activity

9.00

Welcome and introductions

9.30

Overview – What is Open Science?

10.00

Presentation – An introduction to Data Sharing (inc. benefits and challenges)

10.30

Exercise – Overcoming Fears About Sharing Data

11.00

Coffee Break

11.30

Presentation – How to Share Your Data

12.00

Exercise – Identifying a Long-Term Home for Your Data

12.30

Presentation – Some Useful Resources for Open Science

13.00

Ends

 

Costs and Registration

The cost of the workshop is £150, which includes all refreshments.

Register now.