open data

Digimap is 10

I had a very enjoyable day yesterday helping EDINA celebrate 10 years of the Digimap service. What began as an eLib project and experiment with 6 Universities in 1996 has grown to a mature service with over 100,000 users, 45,000 of them active, in pretty much every UK University, and soon in UK schools as well.

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iPres 2009: Micah Altman Keynote on Open Data

Open Data is at the intersection of scientific practice, technology, and library/archival practice. Claims that data are at the nucleus of scientific collaboration, and data are needed for scientific replication. Science is not just scientific; it becomes science after community acceptance. Without the data, the community can’t work.

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Wilbanks on the Control Fallacy: How Radical Sharing out-competes

Closing the first day of the International Digital Curation Conference, and as a prelude to a substantial audience discussion, John Wilbanks from Science Commons outlined his vision and his group’s plans and achievements. His slides are available on Slideshare and from the IDCC web site.

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Data publishing and the fully-supported paper

Cameron Neylon’s Science in the Open blog is always good value. He’s been posting installments of a paper on aspects of open science, and there’s lots of good stuff there. Of course, Cameron’s focus is indeed on open science rather than data, but data form a large part of that vision. In part 3: “Making data available faces similar challenges but here they are more profound. At least when publishing in an open access journal it can be counted as a paper.

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Many citations flow from data...

I've been at the UK e-Science All Hands Meeting in Edinburgh over the past few days (easy, since it's being held in the bulding in which I work!). Lots of interesting presentations; far too many to go to, let alone blog about. But I can't resist mentioning one short presentation (PPT), from Prof Michael Wilson of STFC. His pitch was simple: publishing data is good for your career, especially now. And he has evidence to back up his claims!

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Semantic web on the Today programme

Turning on the radio this morning, I was surprised to hear someone discussing data on the Today programme on BBC Radio 4. It turned out to be Sir Tim Berners Lee talking about the semantic web; he even managed to mention RDF and HTML without confusing the interviewers too much. The interesting 8 and a half minute discussion is available via the BBC iPlayer.

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Novartis/Broad Institute Diabetes data

Graham Pryor spotted an item on the CARMEN blog, pointing to a Business Week article (from 2007, we later realised) about a commercial pharma (Novartis) making research data from its Type 2 Diabetes studies available on the web. This seemed to me an interesting thing to explore (as a data person, not a genomics scientist), both for what it was, and for how they did it.

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Open Data Licensing: is your data safe?

Over on the Nodalities blog, Rob Styles wrote about some of the aspects of open data licensing, and the tricky questions of copyright versus database right. OK, yawn. Let me put that another way… over on the Nodalities blog, Rob Styles writes about whether you can make your data openly accessible on the web without getting totally ripped off in the process. A bit less of a yawn?One key quote:

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Open Data... Open Season?

Peter Murray Rust is an enthusiastic advocate of Open Data (the discussion runs right through his blog, this link is just to one of his articles that is close to the subject). I understand him to want to make science data openly accessible for scientific access and re-use. It sounds a pretty good thing! Are there significant downsides?

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Open Access everyone? Or not?

I occasionally look at the OpenDOAR service, which list information about repositories, and check out those which claim to include data (the term they use is datasets, although it is possible that “other” might also be applicable!).

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