research data

Novartis/Broad Institute Diabetes data

Graham Pryor spotted an item on the CARMEN blog, pointing to a Business Week article (from 2007, we later realised) about a commercial pharma (Novartis) making research data from its Type 2 Diabetes studies available on the web. This seemed to me an interesting thing to explore (as a data person, not a genomics scientist), both for what it was, and for how they did it.

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Data, repositories and Google

In a post last year, Peter Murray Rust criticised DSpace as a place to keep data:"The search engines locate content. Try searching for NSC383501 (the entry for a molecule from the NCI) and you’ll find: DSpace at Cambridge: NSC383501"But the actual data itself (some of which is textual metadata) is not accessible to search engines so isn’t indexed. So if you know how to look for it through the ID, fine. If you don’t you won’t. [...]

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Repositories for the people?

I have been doing some thinking over the past couple of months about the role of repositories in digital curation, and it appears that others have as well. Dorothea Salo (Digital Repository Services Librarian at George Mason University) wrote a series of fascinating posts on her Caveat Lector blog, illustrating through fictional personae the dilemmas faced by many of the players in science, in academic and non-academic management in the fictional University of Achaea. The players are:

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More posts on the 3rd Digital Curation Conference

Somewhat belatedly, I found a series of posts blogged during the 3rd International Digital Curation Conference in Washington last month by K-State Libraries Conference Reports (more than one individual). The posts included (with some highly selective personal choice extracts):Digital Curation Conference: a general comment

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10 Downing St on AHDS...

How exciting to receive an email from 10 Downing St this morning! It tells me that "The Prime Minister's Office has responded to [the AHDS] petition and you can view it here"This refers to the AHRC's decision to cease funding the AHDS, which this blog discussed earlier. I signed the petition, the details of which were:

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Murray-Rust on Digital Curation Conference day 1

Peter Murray-Rust has blogged on our conference in Washington DC:Overall impressions - optimistic spirit with some speakers being very adventurous about what we can and should do.He paid particular attention to the national perspective from Australia:

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Anticipating day 1 of the International Digital Curation Conference

Starting in 3 hours or so in Washington DC. I'm quite interested in the various different national approaches being discussed in the morning. Two questions I would like to ask:

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Two fundamentally different views on data curation

A few months ago, we interviewed two scientists for two quite different posts in the DCC. Both were from a genomics background, and I was very struck by how strongly held, but from my point of view how narrow, was their view of curation. As a result, I’m beginning to realise that there are two fundamentally different approaches to data curation

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Posting gap… and intriguing article on “borrowed data”

Apologies to those of you who were interested in this blog; there has been only one posting since the end of August. Shortly after that I went off-air after an accident, and since then I have been recovering. Although not yet officially back at work, I hope I have now reached the point where I can start making some postings again.

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IJDC again

At the end of July I reported on the second issue of the International Journal of Digital Curation (IJDC), and asked some questions:

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