IDCC15 Keynote to focus on Digital Humanities

16 October, 2014 | in DCC News
By: Bridget Robinson

We are delighted to announce that Melissa Terras will be delivering the keynote address at IDCC15 on Tuesday 10 February.

Melissa is the Director of UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, and Professor of Digital Humanities in the Department of Information Studies at University College London (UCL), where she teach Digitisation and supervises a range of Masters and PhD students. Melissa’s research interests involve applying computational technologies to Humanities problems, to allow research that would otherwise be impossible.

The keynote address will be entitled "The Stuff We Forget: Digital Humanities, Digital Data, and the Academic Cycle". The talk will consider a number of key questions including:- Where does digital preservation fit into the academic output and publication life cycle? How is Digital Humanities helping those in the Humanities to understand about the complexities of looking after their data sets, long term? What issues are Digital Humanists dealing with - or avoiding - in their long term view of research data, and how can this inform how we look at provision for data preservation within the academic life cycle in general? The talk will seek to sketch out how digital projects are dealing with digital preservation, and what the desires and requirements are for those working in the Humanities for this area.

Melissa says "I am excited to be attending the IDCC conference, and talking about issues of data longevity and storage for the arts and humanities. It shows how central the ideas the IDCC community are grappling with are, to a range of practitioners, and how important looking after our data is in all aspects of scholarly work."

The keynote session will be entitled " The Stuff We Forget: Digital Humanities, Digital Data, and the Academic Cycle." and will consider a number of key questions including:- Where does digital preservation fit into the academic output and publication life cycle? How is Digital Humanities helping those in the Humanities to understand about the complexities of looking after their data sets, long term? What issues are Digital Humanists dealing with - or avoiding - in their long term view of research data, and how can this inform how we look at provision for data preservation within the academic life cycle in general? The talk will seek to sketch out how digital projects - many specifically at UCL Centre for Digital Humanities - are dealing with digital preservation, and what the desires and requirements are for those working in the Humanities for this area.

Melissa says “I’m excited to be attending the IDCC conference, and talking about issues of data longevity and storage for the arts and humanities. It shows how central the ideas the IDCC community are grappling with are, to a range of practitioners, and how important looking after our data is in all aspects of scholarly work”.

Registration for IDCC15 will open shortly.