Because good research needs good data

Workshops

DCC workshops may combine case studies, presentations and/or interactive breakout sessions to explore some of the more complex issues affecting digital curators today.

In conjunction with Digital Preservation Europe (DPE), Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER), and Network of Expertise in Long-Term Storage of Digital Resources (nestor), we delivered a joint workshop on the long-term curation of scientific and scholarly digital repository content. This event was organised as a follow-up to our DCC Workshop on Long-term Curation Within Digital Repositories on 6 July 2005.

Evidence-based evaluation has been used successfully for many years to establish trust in traditional repositories such as museums and archives. It is, however, a mistake to assume that the trust earned by a repository that successfully manages and preserves analogue material can be transferred to their digital holdings. Such cavalier assumptions pose a substantial threat to the long-term accessibility and reusability of our collective memory and scholarship. Recent international activity has championed the need for evidence-based evaluation of digital repositories.

This practical tutorial provided a contextual overview of the need for an evidence based evaluation of digital repositories and offered an overview of the DCC pilot audits to date.

This is the fourth in a series of workshops held jointly by the DCC and a regional e-Science centre (the Imperial College Internet Centre in this case) for the exchange of practitioner experience and sharing advice on data curation.

As the LOCKSS Pilot Programme draws to an end, participants gathered together at this workshop to discuss their experiences, lessons learnt, and ways in which the UK community can move forward.

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This practical tutorial provided a contextual overview of the need for an evidence-based evaluation of digital repositories and offered an overview of the DCC pilot audits to date.

The number of projects and institutions providing training on digital preservation has increased dramatically in recent years, resulting in a vast and often overwhelming number of courses for potential attendees to choose from. As UK and EU projects such as DCC, DPE, CASPAR and PLANETS begin to finalise their own overall training plans, it is clear that increased collaboration is needed in order to establish a more co-ordinated approach.

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