Because good research needs good data

Workshops

DCC workshops may combine case studies, presentations and/or interactive breakout sessions to explore some of the more complex issues affecting digital curators today.

As research data management is increasingly seen as a vital component of high-quality research, academics are looking to their institutions to provide support for activities which they lack the skills and resource to deliver themselves. The responsibility of institutions to provide support is being reflected in research funder mandates more explicitly. Coupled with this is the recognition that well-managed, visible research outputs, including data, are an asset both to researchers and their institutions.

Data management planning of some form has been accepted good practice for many years as a means to ensure that data outputs are managed appropriately. This helps to ensure they are discoverable, reusable and preserved, or conversely – in the case of sensitive data – to be kept under wraps. The production of data management plans (DMPs) is mandated by an increasing number of funders worldwide, and universities increasingly seek to provide services to support researchers in this activity.

Responsible data management has increasingly become an expected element of high quality research. Funding body mandates are reflecting this change, and they now place emphasis on providing evidence of appropriate provision for data management and curation in grant applications.

This half-day workshop will provide an introduction to the research data management landscape and will look at data sharing and data management planning in greater detail. The agenda will include a mixture of presentations and workshops, allowing opportunities for questions and discussion.

Open Science is the practice of science in such a way that others can collaborate and contribute, where research data, lab notes and other research processes are freely available, under terms that enable reuse, redistribution and reproduction of the research and its underlying data and methods.

This half-day training course:

While Open Access publishing is quite well established in most Universities, managing data to facilitate sharing is less well understood. This event will provide an introduction to research data management (RDM) and sharing, including its drivers and benefits, and introduces a number of tools and resources that can be freely accessed in order to support these changes in practice.The session will also include an introduction to the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 Open Data pilot. 

While Open Access publishing is quite well established in most Universities, managing data to facilitate sharing is less well understood. This event will provide an introduction to research data management (RDM) and sharing, including its drivers and benefits, and introduces a number of tools and resources that can be freely accessed in order to support these changes in practice.The session will also include an introduction to the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 Open Data pilot. 

 

This course will explain how the DMPonline tool for Data Management Planning can be customised by institutions. You will be introduced to the concept of templates and guidance used in the tool, and shown the range of options available for adding details of local requirements and support. The course will be based in a computer lab so the examples demonstrated can be tried out in practice.

This workshop was organised by the Digital Curation Centre, the California Digital Library and the DART project. The aim was to bring together people undertaking work on Data Management Plans (DMPs) to provide an international forum for sharing lessons and expertise. The DART project methodology for developing an evaluation rubric was used in a practical exercise on reviewing DMPs.

The session is aimed at librarians, researchers, administrators and technology support professionals who need to develop and advance their organisation’s support for research data management. Participants will gain practical knowledge about how to scope, implement, refine and sustain their RDM services along with pointers to useful free tools and resources. 

The session wais aimed at librarians, researchers, administrators and technology support professionals who need to develop and advance their organisation’s support for research data management. Participants will gain practical knowledge about how to scope, implement, refine and sustain their RDM services along with pointers to useful free tools and resources. 

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